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They say you are what you eat…

I love food. I know everybody loves to eat good food, but food for me is more than that. It’s a passion, a hobby of mine to eat amazing food. Another passion of mine is travel and these two go hand in hand, food is one of the main reasons I love to travel.

I especially love the food that I’ve eaten in Southeast Asia. The variety of food and the variety of the flavors is simply awe-inspiring and something I can’t get enough of. If it wasn’t for my jet lag occasionally spoiling my appetite I’d eat all day while vacationing there.

I’ve eaten a lot of different and interesting things. There are however some foods that are so obscure not even I would touch them. I’ve eaten crocodile, kangaroo, shark and zebra and those very good. Usually for me the bigger it is, the more accepting I am of eating it. It might be a strange analogy but think about it. You’d eat a cow, but you probably wouldn’t eat a mouse. You’d eat a chicken but you probably wouldn’t eat a tarantula. And for the vegetarians out there, you’d eat a cucumber but you wouldn’t eat a… a flower? I don’t know I just wanted to show some solidarity for my vegetarian homies. You get the point.

It’s kind of strange though that we’re so selective of what we eat. These habits have found their way into our society and cultures.

There are enough places in the world where they eat bugs for instance. When I was in Thailand, they were selling bugs on the street for consumption. I mean, they don’t really eat them that much there and it’s more of a tourist thing but you won’t see that sorta thing in the streets of New York. I wasn’t brave enough to try it, mostly due to the illegal insecticide they use to kill the bugs (at least, that’s what I tell myself).
There are places in Africa they use little flies to make burger patties and there’s even a heavily fermented cheese in France that has maggots living in it (it’s supposed to be that way). In some cultures it’s probably deemed strange to complain to the waiter if there’s a fly in your soup.

If we all added insects to our diets though, it would solve a lot of problems. Or at least, it will. The world’s population is ever-growing and it brings more mouths to feed. Eating insects will be a good solution to the issue of dwindeling food supplies that will sooner or later present itself. Check out this video for more on that:

Another interesting way society has impact on our eating habits is how we will eat certain animals, but will denounce the eating of others. For instance, we value the life of a cow more than that of a dog. They’re both living creatures that we should respect but we somehow decided that eating dogs is a taboo. Because dogs are more intelligent and much more of a companion than other animals? What about pigs? Pigs tend to be much faster learners than dogs. Sure, pigs might be more independent than dogs but so are cats. And we don’t eat those either. I’m not saying that we should all start adding dogs to our diets but it’s funny to see how people work that way.

It’s interesting to see how much impact society and cultures have on our eating habits. How eating one thing can be considered not-done in one culture but that same thing can be considered the norm in the other culture.

Oh, and about how we all should be eating insects, guess what? You’ve been eating insects all your life. The FDA allows a minimum of insect remains in our daily produce and I’m not even going to start on red food coloring used for candy and juice.

Okay I will, it’s made from crushing these things

Stay hungry and keep on loving food.

Appetizingly yours,
A-Typical

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